MIRIAM HERIN

... from the award winning author of Absolution comes a tale of human evil, corruptibility and weakness, resilience and courage ...

 

Kirkus Reviews March 15, 2016 magazine features A Stone for Bread as a Kirkus “Indie Books of the Month” Selection.

Starred Kirkus review: “Herin’s carefully constructed narrative steadily builds in tension as its separate storylines accelerate and pull together; the reader learns more about the surprisingly heady time Beam spent in France with Eugénie, and the pitched back-and-forth of his encounters with Renard. At one point, Beam tells Rachel: “Passion is that way in us, one-third God, two-thirds devil.” As Beam’s feelings for Rachel deepen, clues begin accumulating about a mystery in Rachel’s own past. In this last thread, there might be a touch too much contrivance for some readers, but the compelling book’s dramatic structure is carried with such eloquence and earnestness that its author can pull off the occasional plot convenience. The series of climactic revelations is expertly done.”

–“beautifully written.” Five-star review by Goodreads reader “Pat” See full review at Goodreads.

–a “remarkable new novel…” Linda C. Brinson, Greensboro News & Record See full review at News & Record.

–“epic literary mystery….” –L.C. Fiore, author of Green Gospel

 

 

 

 

 

A top-ten finalist in the 2014 Faulkner-Wisdom Novel Competition

Herin “doesn’t merely portray the era — she writes about Germany and France in the 1940s as if she lived there. A STONE FOR BREAD is a novel that explores the mysteries of the human spirit — our capacity for deep evil and also deep love.” Mary Moore, 5-star Goodreads Review. See full review at Goodreads.

–“…a vivid picture of a man struggling with his past, trying to understand how that past and his desire to do the right thing ruined him.” Deidre Smith. See full review at the Salisbury Post.

“…a narrative as real, as harrowing, as documentary footage… a supremely ambitious book from a thoroughly gifted writer.” –Joseph Bathanti, author of The Life of the World to Come

“…piercing and evocative, imaginative and unsettling, psychologically thrilling…” —Judy Goldman, author of Losing My Sister